Show off with Furoshiki, the lovely japanese scarf giftwrap technique

The countdown to Christmas has now properly started. Soon, the last weekend before gift-giving day will be here. If you are still planning on how to giftwrap your presents, have you considered the super ancient but also mega cool japanese art of wrapping with scarves also known as Furoshiki?

Scarf Giftwrap Furoshiki - Irene loves crafts

Much easier than it looks and it’s two presents in one. Pop down to your local charity shop (if on a budget) or any clothing store (if not) and pick a few nice scarves, your presents will definitely stand out! I have tested out 4 wrapping styles which are suitable for four different shapes. Find the written tutorial after the  pictures

 

Kouse Tsutsumi – or the slender object carry wrap

Suitable for small piles of books of similar shape, a shoe box, a box of chocolates or any sort of rectangular shape.

Scarf giftwrap - Kousa Tsutsumi 1 Scarf giftwrap - Kousa Tsutsumi 2 Scarf giftwrap - Kousa Tsutsumi 3 Scarf giftwrap - Kousa Tsutsumi 4 Scarf giftwrap - Kousa Tsutsumi 5

How you do it:

  1. Put the item in the centre of the scarf. 
  2. Take the top and right corners of the scarf and tie them
  3. Take the bottom corner of the scarf and slip it under the knot, it’ll now be between the two other bits
  4. The same corner you just slipped under the knot, tie it together with the left over corner going above the existing knot – sounds complicated but it’s not, the picture should help
  5. You now have a super quirky pressie 

Otsukai Tsutsumi – or the basic carry wrap

Ideal for big books or boxes

Scarf giftwrap - Otsukai Tsutsumi 1 Scarf giftwrap - Otsukai Tsutsumi 2 Scarf giftwrap - Otsukai Tsutsumi 3 Scarf giftwrap - Otsukai Tsutsumi 4

How you do it:

  1. Put the item near one of the corners and fold the scarf over it
  2. “Roll it” so it’s about half way down to the scarf
  3. Fold the bottom corner towards the centre so you only have the left and right corners. Tie them up 

Bin Tsutsumi – or bottle carry wrap

Ideal for two bottles or similar shaped items, even if it’s small scented oil bottles like these, you’ll just need a smaller scarf.

Scarf giftwrap - Bin Tsutsumi 1 Scarf giftwrap - Bin Tsutsumi 2 Scarf giftwrap - Bin Tsutsumi 3 Scarf giftwrap - Bin Tsutsumi 4

How you do it:

  1. Make the two bottles/ items stand up in the middle of the scarf with about 1cm of separation. Tumble them over to their sides so they are laying horizontally on the scarf.
  2. Fold the bottom corner over the bottles
  3. Starting on the bottom side, roll the scarf and bottles towards the top corner
  4. Get both left and right corners together as you make the bottles stand up. Tie them up 

Yotsu Musubi – or 4 tie wrap

Ideal for square boxes. (note – the scarf I used was actually too big for the box, bare those proportions in mind if you decide to go for it)

Scarf giftwrap - Yotsu Musubi 1 Scarf giftwrap - Yotsu Musubi 2 Scarf giftwrap - Yotsu Musubi 3 Scarf giftwrap - Yotsu Musubi 4

How you do it:

  1. Put the box in the centre of the scarf
  2. Take the top and bottom corners and tie a knot on the top of the box
  3. Take the left and right corners and tie a knot on top of the previos know
  4. If necessary, re-tie the first (and bottom) knot over the new knot – so essentially it’s tied 3 times

After all this wonderful Furoshiki you can still decorate this lovely presents with some cool name tags, pine cones, baubles, anything you like really. Go crazy!

These tutorials and many more can be found at Furoshiki.com

If you want to find out more about Furoshiki, check out it’s Wikipedia page here

Advertisements

3 thoughts on “Show off with Furoshiki, the lovely japanese scarf giftwrap technique

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s